It’s the end of the road for Equallogic. Now what?

Dell and EMC are getting married again. In this being their second marriage, they are taking Compellant and Powervault, but leaving Equallogic as the possession sold in the Saturday morning garage sale.

What does this mean for the current Equallogic users? The support is ending, to extend support if even possible, is really expensive. So you, the IT person says, “well I’ll limp along until my budget allows me new storage”. Oh wait, no support contract, no firmware upgrades you think to yourself. “Will my critical data be unstable with no firmware updates?” I’ll be able to get hardware for a while should something fail, but… that …software……sigh.

You don’t have to be held hostage by the hardware OEM’s for your storage. The 3 to 5 year rip and replace cycle of pain, agony and expense doesn’t have to continue to be part of your daily pain and suffering. The difficult marriage to your storage can be repaired with a little information,  some trust and your current hardware. Yes your CURRENT hardware if you desire to keep it. Or, get a little crazy and mix your hardware up. Live dangerously, but keep your data safe.

What makes storage smart isn’t the hardware, it’s the software.  So why not get the smartest software out there that can run on ANY OEM and out perform everyone else and why not get the best least expensive hardware to run it on. www.velocitytechsolutions.com

One word…… DATACORE. Datacore San Symphony V Software defind storage  is hardware agnostic. It will run on any OEM hardware. If your need is for speed check out the SP1 RECORD BREAKING SPEED:  https://www.datacore.com/best-price-performance-fastest-response-time. If your need is high availability or business continuity, there are real cases of years of zero downtime. Is managing data in one pane of glass a dream for you? They have that covered too.  Latency is minimal with Datacore as their parallel i/o keeps those multi cores working as they can simultaneously handle compute, networking and i/o loads with minimal hardware.

Let’s talk dollars and “sense”. At $ .08 /SPC-1 IOPS Datacore blows away the $.41/SPC-1 IOPS of and EMC VNX8000 storage array. In real dollars we can say as an example an  EMC VNX8000 will run about $177,000 for a mid range storage. Datacore $38K. And oh by the way, get ready to spend more than $177,000 in 3 to 5 years when support ends and you get ready for a rip and replace that EMC array. If you want to change your hardware with Datacore in 3 to 5 years aside from the hardware you want to purchase your cost:  $0.00. You don’t have to EVER buy a new license. What makes sense to you?

Datacore really does what Nutanix does for Dell, what ScaleIO does for EMC , and  what On Command does for Net Apps array. The difference is you no longer have to be bullied by the OEMS to spend excessive amounts of money just for it to do the same thing Datacore can do on a JBOD, or a DAS. So keep your old hardware, buy some new less expensive hardware, or go for recertified. Keep that return on investment to invest in your organization.

The partnership of Velocity Tech Solutions and Datacore Software gives you the best of all things storage. Low cost, high availability, speed and ease of use. Check us out, ask some questions, and don’t hesitate to ask for a demo.

Differences between Dell 11th Generation Servers

Differences between Dell 11th Generation Servers By Jane Shallow- Velocity Tech Solutions

So, you want to purchase a Dell server and suddenly you are confronted with a bewildering variety of Dell Server models. What processors do the various servers run, how many dimm slots does each have, how many drive bays? Never fear, here is a handy chart of the 11th generation servers that explains the differences, so you can choose exactly what you need.

First, some terminology. An R in front of a Dell server model means it is rack mounted. A T in front of the model means it is a tower. So, an R710 is a rack mounted 710 model and a T710 is a tower 710 model. Towers are almost always more expensive than racks in the same model, so if you can get away with running a rack mounted server, even if you don’t have a rack, you will generally save money. Some of our customers just put a rack mount server on a small table instead of buying a tower and then pocket the savings.

Dell rack mounted servers have a height determination standard call a U. So a model R610 is a 1U server, which means it is approximately 1.5” high. A 2U server is about 3 inches high. A standard rack is often 42U and network engineers use the U height determination to figure out how many servers they can place in a rack. In general, (there are always exceptions to everything), there are 1U, 2U and 4U Dell servers. 1U and 2U are very common and numerous, and 4U are less so because they often take 4 processors and are for very large applications.

The typical differences between servers, other than the ones discussed above, are: how many processors, speed of processor, how many hard drives, how many dimm slots, and redundant or non-redundant power supply capability. To confuse things further, a number of the server models were manufactured with both redundant and non-redundant power supplies, especially the R310s and R410s.

The two models mentioned above were manufactured as well with hot swap hard drive capability and cabled hard drive capability. So it is possible to purchase an R410 in one of 4 ways: Hot Swap/Redundant, Non-Hot Swap/Redundant and Hot Swap/Non-Redundant and Non-hot Swap/Non-Redundant. Too, some were manufactured in both 2.5” and 3.5” hard drive bays, which again multiplies the configurations possible with the same model of server. All this information is not meant to confuse you, rather, take it as cautionary advice to always compare configurations that are exactly the same when price shopping.

A couple of tips: Redundant power supplies are always preferable to non-redundant. That way, if one of the power supplies fails, the server can get along on the one remaining power supply until you can replace the one that failed. Imagine your downtime if you have a server with a non-redundant power supply that fails. In the best case scenario, you have a spare power supply on the shelf and the server is only down for the period of time it takes to change the power supply and reboot the server. In the worst case scenario, your server is down for more than one whole day while the replacement power supply is purchased and shipped overnight to you.

When you are reviewing server specifications for possible purchase, often the server will be advertised as redundant power supply. This does not mean you are being offered two power supplies. The server is capable of running on one redundant power supply and more than one vendor will offer only one redundant power supply in the configuration and then lower the price a bit to try to attract your attention.

Too, hot swap drive capability is infinitely preferable to cabled hard drives. With hot-swap drives you can pull a failing drive on-the-fly and put in a replacement without dropping your server. Look at our website, http://www.velocitytechsolutions.com; there is very good information to assist you with your Dell server.  Continue reading

DELL 9th Generation Risers

By Dylan Kerling – Velocity Tech Solutions

Today, I’m going to do a quick blurb about the 9th generation Dell servers and using different style PCI risers.

Fig. 1 - PCI-E PowerEdge 2950 Risers

Fig. 1PCI-E PowerEdge 2950 Risers

When configuring a PowerEdge 1950 or PowerEdge 2950, there are two expansion risers in the machine.  They come standard with PCI-E slots on both risers (Fig. 1.)

However, while the PCI-E slots are standard, there are also PCI-X risers. (Fig. 2.) These are for if you have some older style expansion cards that you would like to run in your machine that use the older PCI-X style slot.  The issue arises when people have attempted to run both PCI-E and PCI-X risers at the same time.

Fig. 2 - PCI-X Alternate Risers

Fig. 2PCI-X Alternate Risers

When attempting to run both kinds of risers, one of a few things will happen.  The machine will either not post, will go through post and give a riser mismatch error or just not even try to turn on at all.  So, while it is nice to have the ability to run older style cards, you than obviously lose the ability to run newer expansion cards.  So, with all of that said, unless you absolutely have to run a specific older PCI-X card, PCI-X risers, while available, are not the best solution.  Otherwise, you are losing out on the ability to run newer and likely better cards as a result.

Don’t forget to check out our video tutorials at our YouTube channel: velocity783. Have a How-To request?  Request your own and we will get right to work on it for you!

Please feel free to call us anytime at 888-784-2088 or visit our website at www.velocitytechsolutions.com

How to clear an Idrac6

By Anne Tarantino Via Mike Kidd

I had a call from a customer unable to clear his Idrac6. Since in his case he had the BMC, Idrac6 Express and Idrac6 Enterprise, I had to get the big guns, the Kidd, Mike Kidd!

Mike took me through the 3 idracs on a Dell Poweredge R710 and for being not nearly as technical as he is , oddly it made sense to me.  The weird part to me was the clearing of Idrac6 which seemed a bit unconventional.  So often we joke about calling tech support and so often you hear “reboot” or “Unplug it” I will never ever again laugh at those commands from the tech on the other end of the line if I hadn’t seen it with my own eyes.

So if any of you need to clear you Idrac6, be it Idrac6 Express, or Idrac6 Enterprise on your  Dell Power edge R or T series servers, here’s how it’s done:

If your server is coming up saying your Idrac6 can’t be initialized or cannot be found or overall acting up, on your  Dell Power edge R or T series Dell server, then here’s a quick couple of things to  try to get it back online:

  • unplug server from wall – completely power down system and remove power from the wall  for about a minute or 2.
  • Reapply power to system, but do not turn on for a minute or 2
  • Try applying power to see if issue resolved.

 

If this does not resolve the issue

  • completely power down the system, unplug from the wall and remove idrac6 express and/or enterprise Idrac6 if installed.
  • Turn on server, and reset the BMC firmware through the control E menu in post
  • Reset the BMC to defaults you will know it’s resetting to default  when you hear the fans spin up
  • Shut down server unplug from wall again, install the idrac6 express and/or enterprise Idrac 6.
  • Plug in server, but don’t turn on for a minute or 2.

Turn back on and it should work properly once again.

 

Each Dell Power edge T and R series servers come with the BMC idrac on it. There are options for the Idrac6 express and Idrac6 enterprise. Each idrac6 option has various features.

 

 

Thanks for reading and we hope this helps all that need it!

 

 

www.velocitytechsolutions.com