I Always Feel Like, Sombody’s Watching Me

And in some cases, that’s a good thing.

This is not a case of paranoia, (it’s not a case of being stuck in 90’s music either) this is the 21st century and it’s scary out there.

Network security for corporations is growing to be the number one issue that often times companies can’t manage because it remains a low priority. THAT statement makes no sense.

As of 2015 $24- $120 BILLON corporate dollars have been lost on viruses (including ransom, heart bleed, black energy and many more) and thats only whats been reported. You too can be part of the billions should you continue to make network security something “you will get to”.

You say you have invested thousands of dollars on your firewall? Ok that’s a start, but will your firewall know enough to shut down a port at 3 am when 8gb of your customers data (including names addresses and social security numbers) is flying out of your network? Firewalls are smart, but not THAT smart.

80% of your company’s threat are the folks that work there. Have you ever seen someone charge their cell phone in their workstation? This was after they plugged it in to the kiosk at Wal-Mart to print of their pictures. This is after they posted a picture of their lunch on Facebook. EWWWW, there isn’t enough sanitizer in the world to remove all of those germs.

And if the wasted billions of dollars, the Wal-Mart thing and Facebook thing aren’t enough to scare you, then this should scare you; less than 1% of hacks and crimes are reported. No company wants you to think they are unsafe. If you knew there was even a remote possiblity they were unsecure, you would not do business with them.

Check out the Cyber- attacks from October of 2016. Courtesy of hackmageddon.com:

The best way to keep your data safe, is by having it actively monitored. Yes it sounds a little 1990s, but there is still something to be said about humans actually doing some work. Remember that 8gb of data that is flying out of your network with your customers information? Someone watching your network would shut it down, that $10,000 firewall and AI, might let it go since those appliances can be compromised by a high schooler with a months hacking experience

Call or email us for help on this on this huge undertaking. It is easier than you think

www.velocitytechsolutions.com

(651)313-5220 or (651)313-5236

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An additional External Pen Test is a no-brainer for every company, no matter the size, for 2017

Account Executive at Velocity Tech Solutions, Inc.

Let’s face it. You cannot turn on any major media outlet today without hearing about “hacking.”  Whether it’s alleged hacks to affect an election, to attempt to take over a power grid, to steal health care records and information, or simply for someone to fill up their gas tank on your dime through simple identity-theft level hacking – cyber security is an issue for everyone everywhere!

We read about biometrics and dual authentication for everything from a POS purchase to

logging into a mobile device for work.  This is being done for good reason. (Keep in mind, that some of the most embarrassing and comprehensive hacks tend to go unreported.)  Even the “alleged” hack of the Central Bank of Russia, which of course took place during an “unspecified date of 2016” paid an alleged bounty of approximately $31mm USD to the attackers.

We read about terms like a “mega breach” where accounts are hacked in the tens of millions of users for applications such as Dailymotion which is of course much more pertinent to my friends using Android Apps or Google Play for video sharing sites such as Dailymotion (82.5 million users compromised in 2016.)

We read about these breach events weekly, and yet many of us do nothing because we do not know where to begin.

Even if you are in a current contract with a firm that is monitoring your network, or you have created on site, providing 24 hour active monitoring [with real, living, breathing humans in a SOC in addition to AI and automation and scanning etc.] it would be well worth your time to, at a minimum, have another party perform an External Pen Test to ensure that you are getting the level of protection that you are purchasing.  This is also highly relevant to industries that are the most highly regulated (ie. HIPAA, NCUA, FDIC, GLBA, FFIEC, etc.) and must avoid any potential threat of impropriety or conflict of interest.

So, how does it work?  For those of you who already know, contact me for a quote.

For everyone else, begin by gathering a quote from a trusted expert/vendor. They should quickly and easily be able to provide you the cost and timeline for what type of expense would be involved in a quick external pen test.  Many of these firms should specialize in ethical website hacking and other cyber security issues such as documentation/policy writing, social engineering and employee awareness training.

In other words, you want to work a firm who specializes in Cyber Security. It must be their focus, and not something they offer “on the side” or “as a service.”  If they work with a third party, be sure that this is disclosed up front.  Any reputable company will proudly mention the name of their trusted partner.

You’ll need to provide the amount of Public IP addresses you have. They will then get you a quote.  Should you come to agreement on pricing and choose to
proceed with the test – this is where things get exciting!!!!!!

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Image Source

Growing up, we watched Spy vs Spy, Get Smart, James Bond, Burn Notice, Alias, Hackers, Nikita, The Matrix, Mission Impossible, The Net, or any other series/movie where anything from espionage to hacking are the goal. Imagine you’re an ethical spy/hacker.  This generation has Elliott, a cyber-security engineer by day and vigilante hacker by night (“Mr. Robot”) to show us how the underbelly of our society and the dark net operates.  When you perform your pen test, you can assume your favorite persona to investigate your network.

What the penetration test will provide is a combination of the following:

Discovery – security analysts will gather and analyze information about your company.  They will thoroughly test and identify all internet entry points while they prep for enumeration.

Enumeration – here analysts identify targets which were identified during the discovery phase to determine what type of host connection (i.e. web server, firewall, router, etc.) and operating systems (version and patch level) are in use.

Automated Scanning – security analysts use a myriad of tools to determine which potential vulnerabilities to exploit.  Discovery and Enumeration phases allow the analysts to dial in the scanning tools to target their efforts, improve feedback, and rule out unnecessary scanning.

Intrusion Analysis – this is where the analysts provide the lion-share of their efforts.  All results are collected to help you design a network attack plan.  Scanning results are verified so false positives are ruled out and false negatives are explored.  Breaches of your network’s defense system are also analyzed and a mitigation process is developed.

Results – For many companies, something such as a simple patch download will suffice to repair a chain of vulnerabilities.  However, more often than not, the solution is more complex.  Based on what findings are presented in your report, you will now have the knowledge on HOW to protect your network against malicious hackers outside your network perimeter.

An External Pen Test gives you a starting point.  We all know we are vulnerable, but many of us lack the knowledge of where we are vulnerable.  Schedule your quote today to review actual steps you can take to better protect your network for 2017.

Request Quote

Next topic: Internal Testing and Vulnerability Assessments from within your network.

 

An Udderly Incredible Job!

I like to think about the service part of our company as “saving asses among the masses” as we provide IT equipment THAT fast. I can now say with pride that we save the “rumps of every roast”

Yesterday, we had a call from a large farm in Arizona: 1300 cows could not eat.  The server running their feeding machine was down. It’s pretty hard to find a nice green pasture in Arizona.

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So we got on it, built a server put it on a plane for same day delivery. They received it about midnight plugged it in, moved their drives over and the state of Arizona had 1300 happy cows. It really MOOOVED me when we got the call, our rep said the customer said “you guys performed magic”.

Think this through, the STEAKS are high. We hate to MILK this example of how good we are, because I know it’s just GRAZY talk.

I hope you find my post AMOOOSING. Thanks to Stotz Dairy for being a great customer. Seriously, never forget to support your local farm.

Don’t let this go in one ear and out the udder. Redundancy is of most importance! I am NOT STEERING you in the wrong direction. In your organization don’t take for granted that your hardware won’t fail, your software won’t get corrupted and your firewall will take care of all of your network security.

However, if any or all of the above happens, call Velocity Tech Solutions, we’ll be there when you need us.  We are available 24×7.

I’m officially done with this post for heifer and heifer amen.

 

How critical is your companies data and what is it’s value to you?

This article was posted in a local Minneapolis paper last week. Sit back and think about your own company’s data and how much that is worth. Think about liability and what that might cost. What happened at Fairview Health Services isn’t uncommon.

There isn’t a one size fits all solution, but research what fits best for your company. Read this article and think about what a disaster like this could cost you.

 

Whistleblower: Fairview Health Services’ IT system keeps crashing

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Fairview Health Services started small.

Founded in 1906 by a group of Minneapolis Lutherans, the hospital provided care to the city’s Norwegian immigrant community.

Over the past century, Fairview’s grown into a behemoth. Still headquartered in Minneapolis, the nonprofit healthcare organization today employs almost 25,000 staffers at various hospitals, dozens of clinics, 50-plus senior housing locations, and nearly 30 retail pharmacies.

That kind of expansion doesn’t come without growing pains. And not just when it comes to its clunky impending merger with University of Minnesota Physicians, or the game of musical chairs playing out at its president and CEO position.

The hospital system’s IT department is regularly straining to keep its systems online — and sometimes scrambling to get them working again at all.

For many years the nonprofit used global conglomerate Hitachi’s computer storage system. Hitachi served as an electronic warehouse for the volumes of medical records generated by 70,000 inpatients and 6.5 million outpatient visits each year.

 

The importance of a health care provider’s computer storage cannot be overstated.

It’s the foundation of the inverted IT triangle, with streams of data funneling downward through applications, to the server, to the network. The storage system is assigned with receiving, compressing, and saving all that information, like a patient’s medications history or the latest lab test results.

“Storage is critical,” says an IT professional familiar with Fairview’s system who spoke to City Pages on the condition of anonymity because he’s still employed in the field. “In compressing all that information up front, it’s working super hard and must be 100 percent active and performing functionally. Otherwise, you can have problems.”

In the fall of 2015 Fairview installed a new storage system. Hitachi’s successor, EMC, a company owned by the multinational corporation Dell, supposedly would be a state-of-the-art replacement. But the Dell EMC system is having stubborn problems that are affecting other crucial IT components.

According to internal Fairview documents, glitches related to the EMC storage system are limiting care givers’ access to Epic, a data system in use at Fairview and many other American hospitals. Epic’s applications are responsible for everything from registering a patient and scheduling blood work to fulfilling pharmacy orders.

In some instances, Fairview staff have intermittent access to the software. In others, chronic issues cause the entire system to be shut down.

And that, in turn, is creating issues for Fairview and its patient caretakers, according to documents obtained by City Pages, and interviews with current employees at the hospital system, who all agreed to speak only on the condition of anonymity for fear of professional repercussions.

One employee has reached out to former Minnesota Attorney General Mike Hatch.

 

“I can confirm I have met with one of the employees, the whistleblower, if you will, who is pursuing the whistleblower matter,” Hatch says.

Hatch added that he was not personally handling the employee’s case, and said he had “forwarded on the [employee’s] message to people in the state government.”

That employee, a veteran Fairview IT worker, says under its old storage system with Hitachi, the hospital chain had one across-the-board IT system outage in 12 years. Since switching to EMC in fall of 2015, it’s had three crashes in one year.

The staffer gives an example of a random hospital patient who checks in at a Fairview hospital. The patient’s name is introduced to the system, where health care professionals can access or add to his or her medical records. If there’s a hiccup somewhere within the larger IT system, Epic can often take the brunt of it. If Epic’s not available, Fairview staff are back to pen and paper.

“So in other words,” the staffer says, “you can’t pull people’s information who are at the hospitals or clinics. So there’s the potential for an impact for whatever they’re going to have done.”

The story of Fairview’s IT problems begins almost two years ago. With its existing Hitachi system needing an upgrade, Fairview was in the market for a new deal. Tasked with finding it was the nonprofit’s newly hired vice president of infrastructure Don Tierney.

This was no small decision. Nor would it come cheap. The system, for instance, would have to fluently interface with Fairview’s more than 1,500 computer applications. The storage hardware and accompanying software had a total price tag of roughly $3 million.

Various companies courted Fairview and Tierney: Hitachi, IBM, Computex and Pure Storage, and a company called EMC. The nonprofit’s IT staff favored sticking with Hitachi and springing for an upgrade.

Tierney awarded the contract to EMC.

“[Tierney] basically said to us, ‘This is what we’re going to get, and you guys don’t have a choice,'” says a Fairview employee. “I have to think they now, at least somewhat, regret that decision. Because the product that they bought wasn’t ready, wasn’t fully baked to handle what it was purchased to do.”

Among the incidents seen since the storage switch was a mid-April ordeal lasting parts of two days, in which “several of our technology systems, including Epic… were behaving inconsistently and a major outage was declared,” according to an April 22 email from Fairview Chief Information Officer Jacques Alistair, Tierney, and another Fairview vice president, Julie Flaschenriem.

The group email, addressed to the Physician and Ambulatory Informatics committee and Nursing leadership, among others, says “intermittent access problems” began “around 2:30 p.m.” It goes on to say that “[a]t 4:50 p.m. access to Epic was disabled for all users; for patient care, it was riskier to have inconsistent access versus no access to Epic.”

The problems began to get reconciled “at 6:30 p.m. and the last hospital finished their reconciliation processes around 11 p.m.,” the email continues.

In this episode, the “major outage” resulted in “access to Epic to freeze” — meaning doctors and nurses couldn’t open the software program they use almost constantly — according to an internal email, which also cites problems with “users’ access, inability to log in and system slowness.”

Tierney would admit as much months later in a Fairview document, which begins, “When systems — Epic or otherwise — are down, taking care of patients becomes more difficult.”

He continues: “IT fully recognizes just how disruptive outages are for everyone, especially to those providing patient care.”

An unreliable IT system raises the potential of compromised care, according to a former Fairview nurse, who worked for the hospital system for eight years starting in the mid-2000’s.

“In the [Epic] system, it does everything for us,” she says. “For the office visit, we enter in all the patient’s vitals, the history, the lab orders are ordered that way, any types of scans are ordered. It’s all electronic surgery scheduling.”

She gives the example of waiting for blood readings for enzymes on a patient who might have experienced a “cardiac event.” In that situation, there’s not a moment to spare.

“If you can’t get that reported to you right away,” the nurse says, “that the patient had a cardiac event — and the Epic is down, and you can’t see it and the person in the lab can’t see it — it wastes time. And it puts the life of the patient in danger.”

Adds a current Fairview employee, “However many years ago, everything was put down on paper. When there’s outages, every clinic, every hospital has downtime procedures when everything is written down by hand. So basically after the computer systems come back up, [staff has] has to go back and key in all that information. But if something gets missed, something gets thrown away, a paper gets lost, it’s kind of a bad deal.”

Hatch, who has reviewed some of the same internal documents obtained by City Pages, agrees.

“You’ve got a major hospital with 20,000 people working there,” he says. “You want to make sure everything is operating in the patients’ best interests. These communications and failures should raise concern.”

In recent months Fairview’s IT issues haven’t improved.

On September 1, “a major outage was declared” just after 9 a.m., an email written later that same day by Tierney acknowledges.

“I’d like to begin by recognizing and apologizing for the difficulties this — and all — system outages cause,” it says. “We know outages cause tremendous complications related to patient care and satisfaction, and for many of you, they make your jobs more difficult.

“Today’s event was a result of too much activity occurring on recently implemented storage system.”

Internal documents show the “event” started “around 8:30 a.m.”

Just after 9:00 a.m. that morning, Fairview IT cardiology manager Patty Vondlerstine wrote, “Users can’t access Epic,” tagging her email “High” importance.

The email chain in the ensuing hours instructs staff to contact Fairview “Operations” for any closing of departments such as “Clinics, OR’s, etc.” It also instructs Fairview’s pharmacies, “for patient safety, [that they] do not update medication records for patients who have moved location” since the outage began.

The issues lasted for hours. All Epic users weren’t granted full access to the system until 7:05 p.m. — more than 10 hours after issues were first reported — according to one of Tierney’s September 1 emails.

“Having to write everything down then input it into the system once it’s back up, I think, really opens you up for human error,” says the former Fairview nurse, who’s worked in the field for three decades. “You can’t order labs electronically so you have to pull a paper lab order sheet, write it down, send somebody to the lab to get this done. Then they’re writing this down. And you just hope everything will get re-entered the way it should be when it goes back up.”

The nurse calls her former employer’s IT problems “a huge deal” for those tasked with on-the-floor patient care.

“I can’t come up with a specific life-threatening situation off the top of my head,” she says, “but if you can’t verify who somebody is, their vitals, what medications they need, what the labs say, if somebody doesn’t get something they were supposed to or if they get something they weren’t supposed to, it sets you up for a huge liability and the possibility of a lawsuit.”

Fairview declined to get into specifics about its IT system and its outages during the past year. Camie Melton Hanily, director of communications and public affairs for the hospital system, sent the following statement in response to City Pages’ questions:

“Patient safety is always our top priority. Like other health care organizations, we have well established plans and processes for care continuity in instances when a particular tool or system is unavailable. It is not our policy to comment on specific patient or employee circumstances.”

Hey You Get Outta that Cloud- or at least ask some questions before you get hung up there

For those of you that went to the cloud, or are thinking of moving to the cloud, can you answer with certainty who owns your data? This isn’t a new question or new controversy, as big data gets bigger, as more data is stored in the cloud, as  more devices hit the market and as more hackers are getting into our banks and government servers  do you own your data and if not who does and where is it?

Over the past few years there has been controversy over the “Cloud” and who owns what data where.   For those willing to play “who’s data is it anyway”, the legal issues aren’t getting any clearer.

As a consumer user of the cloud -posting my so important pictures of my yellow lab Riley on Facebook

rileyhead Riley, the best dog ever!

or using my Gmail account or the obsessive habit of using my Amazon prime account so I can feel like a kid at Christmas every day seeing a box on my doorstep, I fail to realize the pain of this issue: probably because it’s so convenient. I then suggested the cloud as a solution for one of my customers.  That’s when it hit me.

As someone working in technology (ok I’m a sales geek) I need to really think about how real and complicated this issue is to better serve my customers by educating them in the pros and cons of using the cloud

For those thinking of going to the cloud, it seems like such and easy thing. So you call Mr. Cloud company and say “Mr. Cloud company, I want to put my data way up in the cloud so no one can get it.” Mr. Cloud says ok “we’ll store your data and all will be safe in the world forever and ever amen.” You sign the contract there, you’re in the cloud. You’re happy your data is safe, no one will ever get your data, you will have access to it at all times and you don’t have to hire and pay someone to support it.

What you don’t ask Mr.  Cloud company is “what is the trail of your cloud”? Why would you ask that? What is the “trail of the cloud” Clouds don’t trail! Have you ever looked up and seen those long skinny clouds? Yeah, they trail.

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In some cloud companies you give your data to a cloud provider who then outsources its work to another storage or process provider, who’s responsible if your information is lost or damaged? What if that outsourcing happens in another country? So if data is created in one country, but then stored in another the legal rules that apply become blurred. YIKES!!

Now you worry about your data. You call an attorney. What area of law is this? Cloud law isn’t a thing……yet. There are 3 main areas of law (and maybe more) that cover this: Copyright, Confidentiality and Contract. So do you need 3 attorneys? Also if your data is stored or outsourced in another country do their rules apply?

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In speaking with a customer of mine from a University, he mentioned real concern about security in regard to the cloud. He mentioned his concern regarding student personal information as well as student loan information. Once student loan information is breached now we have a tax payer issue, and as he put it, “now we have a federal issue”.

There are guidelines from PTAC – the US Department of Education’s Privacy technical assistance center. But it gets a little “cloudy” regarding the cloud.

What it boils down to is Data Mining or Big Data.  In the education world to use as an example; this is a huge no no as it violates the “no commercial use of student data” policy.  According to Education Weekly when the litigation started in 2014, consent was not given to scan or index emails under the Google for education platform.

This issue isn’t any clearer in 2016 as UC Berkeley has this lawsuit pending for the same thing, called. “UC Berkeley students sue Google Alleging their emails were illegally scanned”.

I have only discussed a bit of the issue, but how about your industry? How about your data? Think about what you personally put out there? Your buying habits, your search habits. What about when you are in crisis? Is that something we want out in the “cloud”?

Should you decide to go to the cloud, read your contracts, ask some questions. Make sure the provider can specify who will be responsible for the data should it be lost or stolen. There should also be a provision in that contract as to who is responsible if the cloud company goes bankrupt, or is purchased by another cloud company.

If you need some help to get started in this process, help is here just give us a call.

www.velocitytechsolutions.com

 

It’s the end of the road for Equallogic. Now what?

Dell and EMC are getting married again. In this being their second marriage, they are taking Compellant and Powervault, but leaving Equallogic as the possession sold in the Saturday morning garage sale.

What does this mean for the current Equallogic users? The support is ending, to extend support if even possible, is really expensive. So you, the IT person says, “well I’ll limp along until my budget allows me new storage”. Oh wait, no support contract, no firmware upgrades you think to yourself. “Will my critical data be unstable with no firmware updates?” I’ll be able to get hardware for a while should something fail, but… that …software……sigh.

You don’t have to be held hostage by the hardware OEM’s for your storage. The 3 to 5 year rip and replace cycle of pain, agony and expense doesn’t have to continue to be part of your daily pain and suffering. The difficult marriage to your storage can be repaired with a little information,  some trust and your current hardware. Yes your CURRENT hardware if you desire to keep it. Or, get a little crazy and mix your hardware up. Live dangerously, but keep your data safe.

What makes storage smart isn’t the hardware, it’s the software.  So why not get the smartest software out there that can run on ANY OEM and out perform everyone else and why not get the best least expensive hardware to run it on. www.velocitytechsolutions.com

One word…… DATACORE. Datacore San Symphony V Software defind storage  is hardware agnostic. It will run on any OEM hardware. If your need is for speed check out the SP1 RECORD BREAKING SPEED:  https://www.datacore.com/best-price-performance-fastest-response-time. If your need is high availability or business continuity, there are real cases of years of zero downtime. Is managing data in one pane of glass a dream for you? They have that covered too.  Latency is minimal with Datacore as their parallel i/o keeps those multi cores working as they can simultaneously handle compute, networking and i/o loads with minimal hardware.

Let’s talk dollars and “sense”. At $ .08 /SPC-1 IOPS Datacore blows away the $.41/SPC-1 IOPS of and EMC VNX8000 storage array. In real dollars we can say as an example an  EMC VNX8000 will run about $177,000 for a mid range storage. Datacore $38K. And oh by the way, get ready to spend more than $177,000 in 3 to 5 years when support ends and you get ready for a rip and replace that EMC array. If you want to change your hardware with Datacore in 3 to 5 years aside from the hardware you want to purchase your cost:  $0.00. You don’t have to EVER buy a new license. What makes sense to you?

Datacore really does what Nutanix does for Dell, what ScaleIO does for EMC , and  what On Command does for Net Apps array. The difference is you no longer have to be bullied by the OEMS to spend excessive amounts of money just for it to do the same thing Datacore can do on a JBOD, or a DAS. So keep your old hardware, buy some new less expensive hardware, or go for recertified. Keep that return on investment to invest in your organization.

The partnership of Velocity Tech Solutions and Datacore Software gives you the best of all things storage. Low cost, high availability, speed and ease of use. Check us out, ask some questions, and don’t hesitate to ask for a demo.

Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota Selects DataCore SANsymphony to Meet Growing Data Infrastructure Needs

Fort Lauderdale, Florida   May 12, 2016   Technology News

(PRLEAP.COM) Superior Performance, Value and Ease-of-Use Are Key Benefits for One of Minnesota’s Largest Nonprofit Social Service Organizations

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. – May 12, 2016 – DataCore Software, the leader inParallel-Powered Software, Application-Adaptive Data Infrastructure and Hyper-converged Virtual SAN solutions, today announced that Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota has deployed DataCore™ SANsymphony™ software to deliver agile data infrastructure that is Always-On – enabling the organization to better realize its objective of responding to Minnesota’s changing needs by being wholly committed to making life better for its citizens.

“DataCore provides us with all of the features we need to solve the problems with our current storage while still being able to use our existing storage hardware, which is a vitally important benefit for us,” explained Jeff Rogers, system administrator, Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota. “Additionally, DataCore has helped our team seamlessly manage storage within the organization’s Virtual Machine (VM) infrastructure.”

Like most non-profit organizations, Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota does not have the budget to buy a lot of high-end storage with all the necessary features the organization requires. The organization decided to purchase DataCore for a variety of reasons, including its robustness in managing storage and its performance and the fact that any brand of storage hardware can be used, enabling Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota to save a substantial amount of money. Additionally, they found that the UI is very easy to use, and has great reporting tools.

The storage and broader data infrastructure issues facing Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota prior to DataCore were numerous — most notable was the problem of failover and high availability. The prior storage infrastructure was not able to seamlessly failover without trouble from the VM, which ultimately caused a lot of corrupted VMs. Now with DataCore, fail over to other storage nodes in the cluster is simple.

Another issue the organization faced before deploying DataCore’s Software-Defined Storage platform was that when an administrator allocated storage to a VM, it would take all the allocated space from the SAN. However by using DataCore SANsymphony, Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota is able to overcommit storage because DataCore keeps real-time statistics on how much ‘actual’ storage is being used by its VMs. Additionally, having the real-time statistics that SANsymphony provides via its inherent reporting tools helps the organization troubleshoot VMs that may be using too much I/O. Before deploying SANsymphony, if a VM caused any I/O issues, it was very hard to track it down – even by using third-party tools. DataCore’s real-time reporting statistics now help Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota track down the troubled VM very quickly.

Rogers further added that when he and his team tested DataCore in their lab by running ‘hardcore I/O tests against it’, that “DataCore out-performed other products by at least five times more IOPS.”

Reseller Velocity Tech Solutions Joins the DataCore Revolution and Quickly Solves the Data Infrastructure Needs for Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota
Velocity Tech Solutions is one of the more recent value-added reseller (VAR) partners that has joined with DataCore to revolutionize data infrastructure to help its client base.

“Velocity Tech Solutions sees DataCore as a springboard to delivering best-of-breed storage solutions and empowering our customers,” stated Kay Winchell, president, Velocity Tech Solutions. “This has been the case at Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota. It does not matter to DataCore what hardware is running, and what is even better – the hardware does not have to be brand new. DataCore helps to position our firm in the storage space, which was exactly what we wanted in becoming a DataCore VAR.”

Another Believer in the DataCore “Difference”
According to Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota’s Jeff Rogers, “My favorite feature of DataCore is the auto tiering. I can just assign the storage to different tiers, and over time, DataCore calculates the hot vs. cold data, and moves them to the appropriate disks. With the UI you can see the hot and cold blocks of storage in real-time. This helped me to show management that about 90% of our data is cold, so we can get away from buying SSDs and start buying less expensive disks. We have SQL, Exchange, VDI, and file servers all running on the same DataCore nodes, which was not possible with our other storage hardware.”

See the DataCore News Blog for an article concerning Velocity Tech Solutions and Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota.

About DataCore
DataCore, the Data Infrastructure Software company, is the leading provider of Software-Defined Storage and Adaptive Parallel I/O Software – harnessing today’s powerful and cost-efficient server platforms with Parallel I/O to overcome the IT industry’s biggest problem, the I/O bottleneck, in order to deliver unsurpassed performance, hyper-consolidation efficiencies and cost savings. The company’s comprehensive and flexible storage virtualization and hyper-converged virtual SAN solutions free users from the pain of labor-intensive storage management and provide true independence from solutions that cannot offer a hardware agnostic architecture. DataCore’s Software-Defined and Parallel I/O powered platforms revolutionize data infrastructure and serve as the cornerstone of the next-generation, software-defined data center – delivering greater value, industry-best performance, availability and simplicity. Visit http://www.datacore.com or call (877) 780-5111 for more information.

DataCore, the DataCore logo and SANsymphony are trademarks or registered trademarks of DataCore Software Corporation. Other DataCore product or service names or logos referenced herein are trademarks of DataCore Software Corporation. All other products, services and company names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective owners.Velocity Tech Solutions and Datacore